Masada is the name given to a group of palaces and fortifications located on the summit of an isolated mountain in the east of the Judean desert, near the southwestern coast of the Dead Sea, and within the limits of the Tamar Regional Council, in the Southern District of Israel.

Masada is known for its outstanding significance in the closing stages of the First Jewish-Roman War, when the siege of the fortress by troops of the Roman Empire eventually led to its proponents to make a collective suicide knowing that defeat was imminent. Today, Masada is an outstanding tourist site, and an important symbolic meaning for Jewish nationalism, as one of the last episodes of affirmation and national resistance before the final diaspora.